Community based rehabilitation concept and characteristics

ISS staff assists with the admission of these students and serves as the primary source of information regarding their immigration rights and responsibilities.

Community based rehabilitation concept and characteristics

The questions of the definition of "person with a disability" and how persons with disabilities perceive themselves are knotty and complex. It is no accident that these questions are emerging at the same time that the status of persons with disabilities in society is changing dramatically.

The Americans with Disabilities Act ADA is the cause of some of these changes, as well as the result of the corresponding shift in public policy. Questions of status and identity are at the heart of disability policy. A moral model of disability which regards disability as the result of sin; A medical model of disability which regards disability as a defect or sickness which must be cured through medical intervention; A rehabilitation model, an offshoot of the medical model, which regards the disability as a deficiency that must be fixed by a rehabilitation professional or other helping professional; and The disability model, under which "the problem is defined as a dominating attitude by professionals and others, inadequate support services when compared with society generally, as well as attitudinal, architectural, sensory, cognitive, and economic barriers, and the strong tendency for people to generalize about all persons with disabilities overlooking the large variations within the disability community.

However, there are many cultures that associate disability with sin and shame, and disability is often associated with feelings of guilt, even if such feelings are not overtly based in religious doctrine.

For the individual with a disability, this model is particularly burdensome. This model has been associated with shame on the entire family with a member with a disability. Families have hidden away the disabled family member, keeping them out of school and excluded from any chance at having a meaningful role in society.

Even in less extreme circumstances, this model has resulted in general social ostracism and self-hatred. Since many disabilities have medical origins, people with disabilities were expected to benefit from coming under the direction of the medical profession.

Under this model, the problems that are associated with disability are deemed to reside within the individual. In other words, if the individual is "cured" then these problems will not exist. Society has no underlying responsibility to make a "place" for persons with disabilities, since they live in an outsider role waiting to be cured.

The individual with a disability is in the sick role under the medical model. When people are sick, they are excused from the normal obligations of society: They are also expected to come under the authority of the medical profession in order to get better.

Thus, until recently, most disability policy issues have been regarded as health issues, and physicians have been regarded as the primary authorities in this policy area.

One can see the influence of the medical model in disability public policy today, most notably in the Social Security system, in which disability is defined as the inability to work. This is consistent with the role of the person with a disability as sick. It is also the source of enormous problems for persons with disabilities who want to work but who would risk losing all related public benefits, such as health care coverage or access to Personal Assistance Services for in-home chores and personal functioningsince a person loses one's disability status by going to work.

Historically, it gained acceptance after World War II when many disabled veterans needed to be re-introduced into society. The current Vocational Rehabilitation system is designed according to this model. Persons with disabilities have been very critical of both the medical model and the rehabilitation model.

While medical intervention can be required by the individual at times, it is naive and simplistic to regard the medical system as the appropriate locus for disability related policy matters. Many disabilities and chronic medical conditions will never be cured.

Persons with disabilities are quite capable of participating in society, and the practices of confinement and institutionalization that accompany the sick role are simply not acceptable. This model regards disability as a normal aspect of life, not as a deviance and rejects the notion that persons with disabilities are in some inherent way "defective".

As Professor David Pfeiffer has put it, " The question centers on 'normality'. What, it is asked, is the normal way to be mobile over a distance of a mile? Is it to walk, drive one's own car, take a taxicab, ride a bicycle, use a wheelchair, roller skate, or use a skate board, or some other means?

What is the normal way to earn a living? Most people will experience some form of disability, either permanent or temporary, over the course of their lives.

Given this reality, if disability were more commonly recognized and expected in the way that we design our environments or our systems, it would not seem so abnormal.

The disability model recognizes social discrimination as the most significant problem experienced by persons with disabilities and as the cause of many of the problems that are regarded as intrinsic to the disability under the other models. The cultural habit of regarding the condition of the person, not the built environment or the social organization of activities, as the source of the problem, runs deep.Characteristics of Adults with Specific Learning Disabilities.

By: Paul J. Gerber. How to think about characteristics.

Community based rehabilitation concept and characteristics

A number of considerations should be kept in mind when considering the characteristics of adults with learning disabilities (LD). Section of the Rehabilitation Act of , Pub. L. No. , 87 Stat. (Sept. 26, ), codified at 29 U.S.C. ยง et seq., is American legislation that guarantees certain rights to people with disabilities.

It was one of the first U.S. federal civil rights laws offering protection for people with disabilities. It set precedents for subsequent legislation for people with. community-based learning, these strategies include academically based community service, civic education, environmental education, place- based learning, service learning, and work-based learning.

Continuum of Care is a concept involving a system that guides and tracks patients over time through a comprehensive array of health services spanning all levels and intensity of care.. The Continuum of Care covers the delivery of healthcare over a period of time, and may refer to .

Community-Based Nursing Practice Media Resources and sees the need for community rehabilitation services, or characteristics (Stanhope and Lancaster, ).

Examples of populations include high-risk infants, older adults, or a cul-tural group such as Native Americans.

Community based rehabilitation concept and characteristics

Recovery support is provided through treatment, services, and community-based programs by behavioral health care providers, peer providers, family members, friends and social networks, the faith community, and people with experience in recovery.

Psychological Research on the Net